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Laurel & Hardy: Great Guns

Laurel & Hardy: Great Guns

  • Rodney Bowcock Jr. posted: 03 Nov at 11:45 pm

    Fox tries to form another Abbott and Costello out of L&H in this usually dull film that has very few bright spots. The boys spend most of their time wise-cracking with jokes that would be very funny coming from Lou Costello, but from Stan they just don’t work. My advice? If you want a good WWII comedy, stick with Buck Privates.
    Rating: 2 / 5

  • Scott MacGillivray posted: 04 Nov at 1:53 am

    This military comedy is Laurel & Hardy’s answer to Abbott & Costello’s “Buck Privates.” A lame script doesn’t do Stan and Ollie justice, but there are a few howlers (including an “inspection” scene with Laurel stashing a crow down Hardy’s pants). A good supporting cast of familiar faces helps. The video transfer is excellent.
    Rating: 2 / 5

  • Tony G. posted: 04 Nov at 4:16 am

    The classic comedy team of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy in their first film for 20th Century Fox is by no means as bad as its reputation. The 1941 wartime film has some very corny moments and lines of dialogue from the supporting cast, but that’s to be expected. Stan and Ollie are reliable as ever in their roles as bumbling army recruits and perform the material written for them by Lou Breslow with assurance and professionalism. GREAT GUNS is by no means as good as the short films that the duo appeared in and had creative control over from 1926 through 1935, but then again neither were the feature length films they performed in during that time period either. GREAT GUNS has a few standout scenes that brought tears to my eyes (with laughter): Stan shoving a crow into Ollie’s uniform during inspection and the ensuing chaos, Stan’s shaving scene and Stan’s running gag during the climactic building of a brigade. And by the way, there are NO musical interludes to irritate us this time! Overall, the film is 74 minutes of fun and classic humor.
    Rating: 3 / 5

  • Lawrance M. Bernabo posted: 04 Nov at 5:26 am

    “Great Guns” allowed 20th Century Fox to announce the “return” of the boys to the silver screen, but unfortunately this 1941 film directed by Monty Banks came out six months after Abbott & Costello’s first starring vehicles, “Buck Privates.” The comparisons did not help Laurel & Hardy, who are the retainers of the pampered son (Dick Nelson) of a millionaire. When their charge is drafted and goes off to prove himself in the Army, the boys get drafted as well to be with him. Actually, the lad does well, not only with the army but with a girl (Shelia Ryan), and it is Laurel & Hardy who have a hard time with the tough drill sergeant. The romantic plot line actually ends up taking center stage and most of the comedy routines are things the boys would have left on the cutting room floor in their hay day. Another sad feature film from the tail end of their great careers.
    Rating: 2 / 5

  • Scott T. Rivers posted: 04 Nov at 7:17 am

    Hampered by material better suited to Abbott and Costello, the decline of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy began with this badly conceived 1941 comedy – a sad comedown from the Hal Roach days. The Boys try their best to redeem “Great Guns,” but it’s a losing battle. Stan and Ollie’s lack of creative input is woefully apparent. If you want to see the team in military surroundings, track down the far-superior “Pack Up Your Troubles” (1932).
    Rating: 2 / 5

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